Rewards for bits


#1

Hello,

I see that there are rewards for follow, subs, sub gifts and hosting etc.

I want to give the user something back when they donate bits. Like 1 bit = 10 points. Could you add this in the next release?

Thank you


#2

This was originally a feature, but Twitch’s ToS specifically say that you can’t reward individuals for cheering with anything specific like that. Stream goals are OK, but points for bits breaks that, I believe.


#3

We interpreted the following:

You may not sell or transfer Bits to other users of the Twitch Service, or offer Bits in exchange for real or virtual currencies...

As points being a virtual currency. Especially as some streamers base giveaways and raffles and other perks based on points in chat. Some streamers, I have heard, even trade keys for games for so many points in chat. So, you can see how this enters a grey area and we just try to avoid it.


#4

Okay, thanks for that information. Nice to know btw.


#5

Looked into this after reading it here, the general agreement seems to be that it means between users or specifically “cheer 500 and I’ll give you £5” or the same with cryptocurrencies.
Seems more this way since streamlabs/elements allows points for bits and they’re probably the most commonly known ones and since they have extensions too are likely to have been vetted to make sure they follow T&C.
The bit which sticks out though is the amount of people who said they’ve messaged Twitch asking for clarification but never get a reply and no one from Twitch has spoken in any of the threads to help clarify or put a final answer to the question so no one is 100% sure what this rule actually covers, though a LOT of streamers (inc. partners) seem to ignore/be unaware of it.


#6

Sounds good. If Streamlabs used that - can we use that too?

And - before I create a new thread: Is it possible to give “Clip-Creators” points too? So I maybe get the users to create more clips.


#7

If Twitch implements a way to get more than the 100 daily clips maybe we’ll add this, but for now we won’t or some will either be confused or mad.


#8

Short answer? Probably not (but have to discuss more internally). I have seen other large bots breaking the Terms of Services of various services and that doesn’t make it right.

To why people ignore it - I had this discussion the other day during the Facebook data leak explosion. How many folks read the TOS or EULA of software and/or services? It is pretty common to just hit “Accept” without reading it. For example, how many folks really have read in detail the Windows EULA or the MacOS EULA? I am going to presume the number of low compared to the number of people that run those operating systems. I do not have statistics but, I am somewhat sure that most people haven’t read the TOS or Developer TOS for most interfaces out there. It is what it is, unfortunately.

To another point on this. There was a bot that Streamlabs bought that was going into channels during raids. We were asked to provide this feature. I contacted Twitch about it and was told that it was against the TOS to ever bring a bot into another channel without the direct permission of the broadcaster. So, I think that speaks to the fact that bot developers may know the TOS of a service but choose to actively ignore it.

We probably err on the side of caution a little bit too much but, we attempt to take these TOS statements very seriously. Hope you understand!


#9

Just to clarify my point wasn’t to try and convince either way with the bits to points, just that it’s a weird situation as the ToS are pretty vague which has lead to literally opposite different interpretations and I feel Twitch seem happy to leave it open like that perhaps so IF backlash occurred with a streamer they could just say “we said they’re not allowed and they did so not our fault” as none of the people in the threads apparently ever got replies.

Twitch aren’t exactly known for enforcement unless it suits them either XD

erring on the side of caution isn’t a bad thing, any backlash will come back to yourselves and the bots reputation. Better to not have a feature than Twitch react and the bot get’s known for ignoring ToS or something.


#10

I agree that the TOS, like any legal document, is vague and makes little sense at times :slight_smile:

I also agree that they enforce when it suits them.

I appreciate your understanding as to why we err on the side of caution.

I do apologize if I seemed overly-zealous in any way in my response.

Cheers!


#11

Not at all, just wanted to make sure no one mistook me piping up out of interest for an argument to get it added XD